Fact Check: Are fracking fluid ingredients not publicly disclosed in Colorado?

Out of Gas

Source:

Nora Olabi

Media Publication:

Westword

Originally Published On:

June 14, 2018

Rating:

Out of Gas

Claim: Fracking fluid ingredients don’t have to be publicly disclosed in Colorado.

Fact: Colorado was the first state to require that producers disclose chemicals—including their concentrations—to state regulators. The Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission requires that within 60 days following the conclusion of a hydraulic fracturing treatment, and in no case later than 120 days after the commencement of such hydraulic fracturing treatment, the operator must complete a disclosure form that includes any additive or ingredient in fracking fluid (for the complete list of what must be disclosed go here).  The information is available at  fracfocus.org.

Rating: Out of gas

Claim: Local municipalities don’t have any regulatory or land use authority within their jurisdictions.

Fact: Local governments have the authority over zoning and the power to address land use impacts, such as truck traffic, dust and lighting that may result from oil and gas development. Two years ago, the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission approved more rules requiring companies to work more closely with communities when operating near residential areas, including negotiating mitigation measures. The City of Brighton, for instance, “works with operators” so they follow greater standards than are required by the state, such as more stringent noise, water and air standards.

Rating: Out of gas

Reviewed On:
June 14, 2018
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